America assists Malawi with medical personnel

The United States government has embarked on a three-year effort to increase human resource capacity for the country’s health sector in a programme called Global Health Service Partnership.

The program is a public-private collaboration of the Peace Corps, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and Seed Global Health, an NGO that sends nurses and doctors abroad to be medical educators.

The program comes as the US Peace Corps celebrate 50 years of work in the southern African nation.

The Global Health Service Partnership Program has also been introduced in other two African countries of Tanzania and Uganda.

Malawi President Joyce Banda officially launches the global health service partnership at the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Peace Corps at Kamuzu Palace (VOA / L. Vintulla)

Malawi President Joyce Banda officially launches the global health service partnership at the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Peace Corps at Kamuzu Palace (VOA / L. Vintulla)

The program, the first of its kind by US Peace Corps in Malawi, will provide health experts to teach in Malawi’s public colleges and universities.

Carrie Hessler-Radelet, the Peace Corps Acting Director, said the Global Health Service Partnership Program volunteers will be in Malawi to teach clinical officers, doctors and nurses on various topics.

They will also be doing on-the-job mentoring and clinical supervision.

The first 11 American doctors and nurses who are already in the country will be replaced by 15 others after a year, according to acting director.

Five physicians have already been assigned to teach at the University of Malawi’s College of Medicine, four nurses at Kamuzu College of Nursing, and two nurses at Mzuzu University.

Malawi has a high maternal mortality rate with about 460 mothers dying for every 100,000 live births.

The program is a continuation of the Peace Corps’ long relationship with Malawi that began when the first 20 volunteers arrived in early 60’s to teach in secondary schools.

Today, Malawi has about 141 volunteers working in education, environment and health sectors.

Follow and Subscribe Nyasa TV :

Please share this Article if you like Email This Post Email This Post

More From Nyasatimes

More From the World

Comments are closed.