Let Malawians judge me, says Pres. Banda one year in power

Malawi on Sunday April 7  marks one year since President Joyce Banda took office after the death of president Bingu wa Mutharika on April 5, 2012.

Since coming to power, Banda has won praise from abroad for introducing economic reforms.

But at home, she’s attracted opposition from critics who say that progress is not moving fast enough

Featured  on BBC Focus on Africa, President Banda  was asked what would be her score card on her first anniversary as  a Head of State , she said Malawians should judge her.

President Joyce Banda: One year in office

President Joyce Banda: One year in office

“I want Malawians to look back, at least where we were. Did we have fuel or not?” said President Banda, who launched reforms in a bid to revive the economy ruined by her predecessor.

Banda said she conducts surveys and know where Malawians are placing her.

“The feedback that I am getting  a year on are different from urban to rural. The rural people have faith and love for me,” she disclosed.

No merry

President of Political Science Association (PSA), Joseph Chunga, said there is nothing worthy to “ celebrate for looking at the past year.”

He said  Malawians have nothing to celebrate  but that there is still everything to fight for to end economic hardships.

Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace (CCJP) national secretary Chris Chisoni said Malawians have nothing to make merry on President Banda and her People’s Party one year rule, saying  people are starving and there are no drugs in hospitals.

Chisoni said Malawi economy is “grinding to a halt.”

Opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) spokesman Nicholous Dausi said Malawians were not happy with President Banda’s rule, saying it has led to starvation, daily price hikes and an inflation rate of closer to 40 percent.

Inherited problems

UDF president Atupele Muluzi  said President  Banda “inherited a very difficult state of affairs and her administration has had to make some very tough decisions in order to recover our economy.

“These reforms have not been easy on Malawians, but we had limited choices. The reform measures undertaken were unavoidable and to ensure the success of these reforms they must be premised upon building State capability, accountability and responsiveness.”

He nonetheless pointed out that good governance is key to the success of the recovery plan.

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