MCP civil war, Msonda and the future of Malawi politics

Last time, I discussed the internal political squabbling in the Malawi Congress Party (MCP). It seems the squabbles are continuing with protracted court battles being almost the order of the day in that camp.

It is not healthy for the country’s oldest, well-oiled political establishment and Malawi’s main opposition political party, whose president, Right Honourable Reverend Dr. Lazarus Chakwera, is Leader of Opposition in Parliament, to be preoccupied with a senseless civil war at the expense of the larger membership of the party and the nation.

I said it that it was important for the MCP leadership to recognize that only intra-party crisis management mechanisms can genuinely solve the current internal bickering. Court litigations and counter-litigations will only help to send the ‘mighty’ MCP farther into the political abyss. The MCP is crumbling before our own eyes. Something must be done, as a matter of urgency, Dr. Chakwera.

Malawi, the poorest country versus opposition

Latest World Bank statistics rate Malawi as the poorest country in the world. The news is as shocking as it is embarrassing not only to the government of the day but to all Malawians. It is during moments like these that a responsible opposition in Malawi, led by the MCP, must positively engage government to find solutions to the devastating social and economic challenges instead of pursuing endless acrimonious political wars.

Malawians are currently facing serious social and economic problems and the opposition political parties must act as an alternative political force to the governing Democratic Progressive Party (DPP).

In a multiparty democracy, opposition political parties, by their nature, are supposed to provide the necessary checks and balances and hold the governing party to account for their omissions and commissions. But this noble responsibility is being undermined by a long-toxic political atmosphere where we have seen MCP leaders publicly trading blame over issues that could have been dealt with, amicably, within the established structures of the party.

The country’s opposition politicians must usually present a united front on Malawi’s deteriorating social and economic status. The majority poor would benefit more from a ‘grown-up’ approach to tackling national issues than witnessing the current wave of political attacks that are clearly aimed at satisfying personal egos.

Msonda exists People’s Party

The above can also be said about one Kenneth Chitatata Msonda of the People’s Party (PP). The self-acclaimed political ‘foot-soldier’ was until Tuesday, September 13, 2016, the party’s spokesperson before he announced he had quit “to spend more time with his family”.

He has not ruled out a “rebounder”.  My good friend Ken Msonda has explicitly announced that towards the 2019 general elections, he shall spring back and work towards winning the Rumphi East parliamentary seat. Good Luck, comrade!

Some quarters, especially within the People’s Party, have alleged that ‘KEMSO’ has been bought by the DPP at the tune of K12 million to help them fight against firebrand and controversial current MP for Rumphi East, Kamlepo Kalua.

Kamlepo Kalua is one of the fiercest critics of President Peter Mutharika and the DPP government. He recently traded barbs with the president and the DPP over the seven ‘rotten’ cabinet ministers allegedly embroiled in the K577 billion financial scandal.

Anyway, I need not to zoom too much at this to find out the real motivation that underpinned his decision to leave the party he swore by Jesus never to leave. But whatever his motivation is, I dare reprimand my friend Ken Msonda for abandoning Malawians at the most critical hour of need.

This is the time that Ken Msonda should have engaged an extra gear to speak on behalf of the underprivileged majority and voice out their concerns about their destitution, which does not seem to go away anytime soon. It is not the time to run away!

It is unfortunate that the political culture in Malawi is largely defined by cycles of defections. Most defectors head towards the governing party, apparently for financial gain and other opportunities that come with belonging to a governing party.

But when all is said and done, Ken Chitatata Msonda has the right to determine his political future. The Republican Constitution provides Malawians the right of association, which includes the right to belong to any political party of their choice. I wish you all the best my friend, KEMSO, as you embark on your new political journey.

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3 thoughts on “MCP civil war, Msonda and the future of Malawi politics”

  1. Kenkkk says:

    That is the problem, dpp dangling huge cashgated stolen money to some officials of her fiercest opposition rivals. Stupidly these poor officials fall for it and start causing problems. That is what is happening with some stupid selfish mcp officials.

    Ken as he told us refused 3mn but it seems now 12mn has caught his eye and will accept this disgraceful bribery, throwing all his principles out of the window. Watch this space for Ken, just resting for the time-being.

    Dpp is trying to conquer the north and central regions by whatever means, hence money enticement, obscene money for most Malawians. While your strategy to conquer the two regions is fine, your implementation and execution is very rotten. Corruption has no place.

  2. Ngalamayi says:

    When will Malawian politicians start working for the good of The Warm Heart of Africa? Malawi has reached the bottom of the list of developing countries, but where our politicians SHOULD be looking at how to lift her up from there, they spend all their time arguing, making sure their families & tribesmen benefit at the expense of the whole country, hiring expensive, unnecessary jets… We need a Magufuli.

    1. Mayonaise says:

      I support that. Huge monies are shared amongst themselves leaving us poorer and poorer.

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