Scottish govt applauds CADECOM’s initiatives in Malawi

Head of International Development for the External Affairs Directorate in the Scottish Government, Joana Keating has commended the Catholic Development Commission in Malawi (CADECOM), a relief and development arm of the Episcopal Conference of Malawi (ECM) for reaching out to vulnerable people in the rural areas through its interventions.

Joanna appreciating  the products from Soy

Joanna appreciating the products from Soy

Joanna touring a Soy field.

Joanna touring a Soy field.

Keating was speaking Mapira Village, Traditional Authority Chimutu in Lilongwe where she visited and appreciated interventions undertaken by CADECOM through its ‘Women Access To Markets and Adaptation to Climate Change Project’ which is funded by the Scottish government through OXFAM.

Keating said she was impressed with the way the project is being implemented particularly noting that it is transforming people’s lives especially women.

“I am impressed with what you are doing in this community. I would like to encourage you that you continue doing this good work,” she said.

OXFAM Country Director, John Makina commended CADECOM for working to the expectation of his organization and the Scottish government as a donor partner.

He said the services rendered by CADECOM are crucial in transforming the livelihood of vulnerable Malawians.

During the visit, Keating alongside OXFAM officials appreciated interventions under the Village Savings and Loans, Soy Production, Small Scale Agro processing, Capacity Building on Access to Markets Concept and Climate Change Adaptation measures.

Azilei Shumba,a soy farmer said the project has benefited her a lot because she is able to access all basic necessities out of farming.

“CADECOM provided us with startup soy of Nasoko variety) through our clubs and this is on a pass on scheme. We were also oriented on the attributes of this variety, for instance its high market value and resistance to drought,” she said as Keating alongside officials from OXFAM toured her Soy garden.

She said she anticipate to harvest 20 bags of soy from her one and half hectors of land and later sell them thereafter use the money to purchase Iron sheets and some pay school fees for her children.

Follow and Subscribe Nyasa TV :

Please share this Article if you like Email This Post Email This Post

More From Nyasatimes

More From the World

3 thoughts on “Scottish govt applauds CADECOM’s initiatives in Malawi”

  1. willard Thipa says:

    Keep on doing better job in our country

  2. WANDANI says:

    Kupeza bwino it’s not about small population size. Look at CHINA vs INDIA and BOTSANA vs NIGERIA. Numbers dont work but minds n commitments

  3. Thitherward Wendo says:

    What is important about these projects is not their size but the fact that they provide examples of people giving some of their money, time and skills to improve the lives of others. Their aim is to help the poor to help themselves. However, I think that there is an even more important lesson that those of us who are fortunate enough not to be poor should learn: if foreigners can help our poor brothers and sisters, so can we. [After all, Scotland is a small country with a population that is only about 30% of Malawi’s.]

    We must learn to change the way we help. Many of us have allowed a poor sister to fill our freezer with freezes for sale, or bought her a bale or two of kaunjika ‘to get her started’, but these rarely develop into self-sustaining activities, usually because the poor sister also has many people dependent upon her, and there is never enough profit to re-invest in the growth of the micro-business.

    Most of us know enough to be able to advise that sister on how to organize and manage her business so that it can become a self-sustaining family or community project. Unfortunately, we are unwilling to spare the time needed to analyse the situation and plan for success. Like the foreigners, we need to be more generous with our time and expertise. ‘Give someone a fish and they will eat for a day; teach them to fish and their family will eat for a lifetime.’ Teach them how to preserve and market their fish, and inspire them with confidence, optimism and ambition, and they will find out all they need to know to establish a self-sustaining fishing industry.

    Start small – but never think small.

Comments are closed.