Mutharika addresses United Nations: Calls for international assistance to address hunger in Malawi

President Peter Mutharika has called upon the international community to come together and address climate change and its effects as the same is reversing development gains in the world especially in least developed countries such as Malawi.

Mutharika addressing the United Nations General Assembly

Mutharika addressing the United Nations General Assembly

Help Malawi as it faces hunger, President Mutharika appeals at UN

Help Malawi as it faces hunger, President Mutharika appeals at UN

President Mutharika and his Malawian delegation at the UN General Assembly

President Mutharika and his Malawian delegation at the UN General Assembly

President Barack Obama greets Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, and General Assembly president Peter Thomson after speaking at the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, Sept. 20, 2016, at U.N. headquarters.

President Barack Obama greets Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, and General Assembly president Peter Thomson after speaking at the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, Sept. 20, 2016, at U.N. headquarters.

UN General Assembly

UN General Assembly

Mutharika was addressing the 71st General Assembly of the United Nations in New York .

The Malawi leader said adverse effects of climate change such as floods and drought are pushing many vulnerable people into poverty all over the world and running counter to robust fiscal and macro-economic reform programs countries such as Malawi are implementing to stimulate economies.

‘‘[ In Malawi ]Our only major setback in the last two years was the effects of climate change. In 2015, we experienced the worst forms of floods which affected over half of the country.’’, Mutharika said.

President Mutharika said the situation repeated itself in 2016 but in a reverse fashion.

‘‘In 2016 the opposite happened and drought scorched half of the country again. This problem has brought us hunger as we could not produce enough food for two consecutive years.’’, Mutharika added.

Mutharika said while the government of Malawi is trying all it can within its means to assist the millions affected, international assistance is still required to fill resource gap. ‘

‘As I stand here, 6.5 million people will this year require food assistance. My Government is doing all it can to provide for these people. However, we need and seek the external support of our cooperating partners and multilateral institutions within and outside the UN system. We still need US$246 million for this cause.’’, he added.

The Malawi leader said as its commitment towards addressing climate change, Malawi would sign the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

Obama’s bow

Earlier, US President Barack Obama, who will leave office in January, spoke  for the last time at UN  as American leader,  agreeing to an international deal on climate change.

Obama warned that there are deep fault lines, however, in the international order causing the massive refugee crisis, economic disruptions and insecurity.

“We see too many governments muzzling journalists and quashing dissent and censoring the flow of information,” he said. “Terrorist networks use social media to prey upon the minds our youth, endangering open societies and spurring anger against innocent immigrants and Muslims.

“Powerful nations contest the constraints placed on them by international law. This is the paradox that defines our world today,” Obama added.

Obama spoke for about 45 minutes. Traditionally, the U.S. holds the second speaking slot of the debate, but Obama arrived late to the hall and the president of the General Assembly skipped over him to the next speaker, Chadian President Idriss Deby.

Ban’s ire

Earlier, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon opened the annual meeting for the final time. He leaves office after a decade at the end of this year.

Ban released years of pent up anger at leaders and countries who have contributed to suffering and conflict across the globe.

He took particular aim at Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, in the wake of an attack on a humanitarian aid convoy Monday that killed 20 people.

“Just when we think it cannot get any worse, the bar of depravity sinks lower,” Ban said. “The humanitarians delivering life-saving aid were heroes. Those who bombed them were cowards.”

The United Nations has been forced to suspend aid convoys because of the attack.

“A political transition is long overdue. After so much violence and misrule, the future of Syria should not rest on the fate of a single man,” Ban said of Syria’s Assad.

The U.N. chief also expressed “regret and sorrow” for two of the biggest blights of his tenure – the cholera epidemic in Haiti and the sexual abuse and exploitation of civilians by U.N. and foreign troops in Africa.

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9 thoughts on “Mutharika addresses United Nations: Calls for international assistance to address hunger in Malawi”

  1. Chishiyu chencheni says:

    Dzikoli likukhala ngati likutsogoleredwa ndi Joe Gwaladi bwanji

  2. Ngalamayi says:

    I hope the president told them that as part of doing all his government can, he still flies by hired jet to speak to these summits! Imagine how many boreholes could be dug, pumps provided, with what he has spent on this trip! How embarrassing this president is!

  3. Chikadza Kuwani says:

    I’m walking around with a small plastic bag full of chitosi cha nkhuku. The day I will meet APM face to face, I will force the stuff down his mouth and throat. The incompetent guy has messed up our country big time.

  4. hhhh says:

    Inu a Gwalade ife amalawi enieni owopa mulungu tikuuzeni motani kuti muvetse kuti ndalama za satanic ife ayi, tikuuzeni titavula?

  5. Gwalade says:

    Mukukana aid ya Bushiri instead mukukapempha uku, shame on you

  6. Precious says:

    With due respect to the President, this is shameful. God has endowed us with a large body of fresh water. We have human resources, agricultural scientists, irrigation specialists, workforce etc. We have donor aid and revenue to buy fertilisers.

    My question is, Is it too hard to utilise these resources to produce food? Cant Malawians use their own brains and intellect to solve issues of food shortages? Where is the merit in your Cabinet and government if they cant move past providing permanent solutions for our basic needs? Drought is just an excuse, because desert countries like Israel and Egypt are able to grow and export food.

    A beggar has no dignity – why should Malawians bring themselves too low?
    What about the money you can save, if you had the will to stop pilferage through cashgate? What about the money that is lost through inflated pricing of contracts and substandard goods?

    As a country we are not developing, physically as well as intellectually? We are retrogressing to become like babies who need to be fed on milk.
    I hope someone high there can read this and see the turmoil and anguish, created by their actions and decisions, in the minds of many Malawians of Goodwill

  7. As I read what Muntharika is saying in UN I feel ashamed. APM as educated as he is should know A zungu knows the major problem in Malawi Corruption. Why do we have to go to beg all The time. If those billiobs and still billions going into pocket of leaders and ministers were going to The nation box AT least Malawi could beg less. Who help Europe? Abale kupemba pika lero? APM have lived in Malawi and he knows how White think about kupempa Once they get money they steal so what is the use. Every year Malawi talk the same thing in UN. KUPEMPA. Seriouly stop. Does education matters in Malawi/APM?

  8. Mbiya Zodooka says:

    Basi! Hiring a plane and go to say what everyone already knows. That speech could have been made by the Malawi Ambassador to the UN. No need to waste money. More developed countries send ordinary minister who can use a taxi to move around in New York. But we understand. Too many poor people in Malawi. When they go on such a trip amati afikapo.

  9. Mbava says:

    issue is resumption of aid thing are expensive coz of theft and u r failing to stamp it down osati za njalazo osathawa apa

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