Norway launches K2.6bn school meals in Malawi

Malawi Government has hailed the Norways’s contribution of  K2.6 billion (about USD3.6 million) to World Food Programme (WFP) to help provide school meals to children in the country.

Minister of Education Msaka and Norway envoy serving the pupils porridge
Some of the pupils enjoying the porridge

The contribution will benefit nearly 767 000 children in primary schools  and early child development  centre in food insecure districts from March to October  2019.

Minister of Education, Science and Technology Bright Msaka hailed the support when he officially launched the school meals to children at Nzobwe Primary School in Lilongwe.

Msaka said the initiative will help in the retention of children in school, reduce malnutrition, infections and opportunistic diseases.

“We are running out of time and without this support we would have had difficulties continuing to feed our children. But with this support and donation we will continue to feed the children in 13  districts of Malawi for a considerable length of time,” said Msaka.

Recalling the benefits that the program has had over the years, the minister said government has put in place measures to sustain the program should donors not be there.

He cited the issue of communities producing own food to feed the children as one of the sustainable measures which he said is already happening in some areas but what is needed is to expand and develop such places.

Norwegian Ambassador to Malawi Steinar Egil Hagen said the benefits of school meals extend beyond the classroom, “they are an investment in child future that is why Norwegian Government will continue supporting the programme.”

He said his government believes in investing in children hence the support.

“Our aim is to support children’s development so that they can become healthy and productive adults, breaking the cycle of hunger and poverty in the most vulnerable areas,” he said.

On his part,  World Food Programme (WFP)  country Director Benot Thiry said WFP supports the programme so that no child fails to go to school because of hunger.

Benot said the Norwegian assistance will help to ensure that the learners are in classes.

The Government of Norway is one of the largest donors to WFP in Malawi having contributed USD13.4 million since 2014 as part of the United Nations Joint Program on Girls’ Education, supporting WFP’s Home Grown School Meals component and building the capacity of smallholder farmers to improve their access to viable markets.

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dan
dan
3 years ago

Please we do not need Norway to buy the stuff for us. We need government policies that would enable production factors to be cheaper so that we produce ourselves.
Why should we need someone to buy the stuff fro us,? why not just produce them ourselves. For me this is degrading after 50years of independence without war amidst us.
I now know that Peace is not only the absence of war

Jose
Jose
3 years ago

Shame on our govt

Kamkuzi
Kamkuzi
3 years ago

Words fail me! 3.6million dollars for porridge? And a whole government minister hails that? This country!!! Shame!

DIPIPI
3 years ago

Give the children better food, not that porridge. You can do better.

Suarez
Suarez
3 years ago
Reply to  DIPIPI

Could you suggest the better food that can be given? I will take it up with the authorities 😊.

Mulomwe
Mulomwe
3 years ago

Msaka should enrol his grandchildren in the government primary schools. Let’s see if they can eat that stuff.

Abiti Jane
Abiti Jane
3 years ago

Pathetic! Norway had to contribute US$3.6 million to feed our children in school. Are you telling the government could come up with the funds? Shame on you Msaka!!

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