Semo bows out with dignity, enters ‘Who Cares?’

Done and sealed. Lions Theatre has curtain-closed public viewing of its play, Semo, with loud applause and cheers.

Semo-a political satire-returned to Nanzikambe Arts Theatre base, Naperi, on Sunday, where it first marked its theatrical journey and imposingly gave Blantyre theatre lovers a last laugh.

The play was written by late Robert Chasowa and Thlupe Chisiza-who also directed it-though had a tough start, as it was mired on its tracks during the premiere last year when authorities pounced on Chisiza for censorship offence.

He was later charged and fined K5,000 by Blantyre Magistrates Court upon pleading guilty to the offence.

Making its final showcase on Sunday, under unimpressive turnout, Semo-a sardonic performance on current administration-appeared gleam and more mature than its first viewing.

Semo in action

The actors were more composed, connected and serious with their lines and, of course, syntax. It was all a new Semo with some scenes cut out.

“We thought of giving our fans a last glance of Semo before we launch another thriller soon. I am happy that people have accepted the play and love it in the end. And it’s our sincere hope that they will do same with our next productions,” said Thlupe Chisiza, son to late theatre maestro Du Chisiza junior.

The Sunday’s show despite being a last performance for the play, it was on other course, a memorial show for Thlupe’s father, Chisiza-who was the father and founder of Wakhumbata Ensemble Theatre (WET), currently lying dormant on its heels.

Lions Theatre is expecting to launch a new play, Who Cares, another political thriller that promises fireworks than Semo.

Semo became a masterpiece last year when Police and censorship officers arrested Thlupe for failing to file the play with the board for a valuation before staging it.

However, the action only made it a darling hyped its demand as witnessed on how people jam-packed its performances.

The play scathes at Bingu wa Mutharika’s administration for its inability to administer the country’s economy and political landscape to the best interest of the whole nation.

It, however, has an underlying theme similar to Nyamilandu that was written by Trupego’s father late Du Chisiza junior.

And just like Nyamilandu, Semo is a wit criticism to the current political administration, and it is of no surprise as to why law enforcers and the toothless censorship board could not miss an opportunity to suppress the truth clipped in the play.

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