Concerned citizens call government to heed civil servants’ concerns

A grouping of people calling itself Concerned Citizens of Malawi led by its Chairperson, Oliver Nakoma, has asked government to listen to concerns by civil servants in the country in a bid to avoid the impending nationwide strike scheduled to start on January 9, 2023.

In a letter signed by Nakoma on 30th December, 2022, the Concerned Citizens of Malawi side with the Civil Servants Trade Union (CSTU) and the Teachers Union of Malawi (TUM) by suggesting that salaries of civil servants should be increased so as to try to cope up with the rising cost of living at the moment.

Nakoma: government should effect a 50% salary increment

They further say that they are worried that the strike may compromise care of Cholera patients and other critically ill people and interrupt the school calendar, among other negative effects.

“We note that recently, parliamentarians raised their daily allowances from K80, 000.00 to K100, 000.00, a move that is supporting the worry over devaluation.

“As a way of preventing the strike, we are pleading with government to effect at least a 50% salary increment to the civil service than waiting for a system shutdown. The repercussions of such a strike can be detrimental and lethal to the already bed ridden economy than a mere salary increment,” reads the letter in part.

CSTU and TUM threatened to stage the strike in a bid to press government to address the high cost of living. CSTU General Secretary, Madalitso Njolomole and his TUM counterpart, Charles Kumchenga, co-signed a statement informing government of the impending strike.

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Citizen
Citizen
1 month ago

50% pay rise sounds like madness.

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