Malawi politicians learn from Zimbabwe elections: President Mnangagwa declared winner as defeated opposition leader rejects result

Malawi politicians say they have learnt a lot from the Zimbabwe poll, saying there was need to accept results to avoid violence and need to release election results as soon as they have been sent from tally centres as Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa  has been officially declared winner of the of this week’s presidential election.

MDC supporters protested in the streets of Harare on Wednesday. Photograph: Mujahis Safodien/AP

President Mnangagwa narrowly wins Zimbabwe historic presidential poll  and said he was “humbled “ on Twitter, and called the results “ a new beginning”.

Chamisa, 40 only became leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in February, following the death of Morgan Tsvangirai – the former union leader who founded the party in 1999.

At least six  people were killed by soldiers  in a day of violence after the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission delayed  in announcing the winner of this week’s presidential election.

On Thursday evening,  Zimbabwe’s embattled electoral commission  announced that  Mnangagwa of Zanu-PF  received 2.46m votes or 50.8% of the 4.8m votes cast.

Nelson Chamisa, the candidate of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), won 2.14m votes and 44.3% of the overall, the ZEC said.

The President said he was “humbled “ on Twitter, and called the results “ a new beginning”.

The opposition party has rejected the presidential result because it was not able to verify the results,  as Chamisa, 40, claimed he had won the “popular vote” and accused Zanu-PF, the ruling party, of electoral malfeasance.

Zimbabwe now faces new uncertainty and probably instability.

But  Malawian political commentator Augustine Magolowondo said there was need for politicians to prepare for defeat and accept the defeat results after an election.

“It is the politicians who incited the violence. The opposition claimed victory even before the results were out, this incited the people, the supporters of the MDC,” said Magolowondo.

Ernest Thindwa, another political scientist from Chancellor College said the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission was to blame for the violence, saying the delay in announcing the presidential results raised suspicion of rigging and vote doctoring.

“There is need for the elections to be seen as credible, free and fair,” said Thindwa.

Malawi Congress Party  (MCP) spokesperson Maurice Munthali said the lesson the main opposition party in the country has learnt is that there was need to draw the agenda from the people themselves.

“Parties should make research to find out what the people want. Unless you research well, you will discover that people are not with you on the polling day,” he said.

He said political party leadership should also accept defeat.

Joseph Chidanti Malunga, the spokesperson for the newly launched United Transformation Movement (UTM) said acceptance of poll results is crucial to avert violence.

“Let people speak their mind through the ballot box, all losing parties should therefore accept defeat,” he said.

Malawi goes to the polls in 2019 but the political landscape is already heated up with the ruling Democratic Progressive Party  (DPP) facing stiff competition from UTM as Malawi Congress Party, the United Democratic Front and Peoples Party have been pushed to the political sidelines.

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Ndendeuli
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Ndendeuli

Easier said than done

Kamikaze
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Kamikaze

Some people where saying this is young movements year for Africa and Chamisas rally attracited huge crowds 3 times Mnangagwa crowds always.Huge crowds does not guarantee more votes but rather people come to here your trashes and stupidity.Least we forget only sometimes youth come and attend hence has nothing to do while the majority sensible people stay put and decide somebodies fate in the polling booth.Age does not matter in Africa take it or leave it but Bewarned! !!!

Heavy-duty
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Heavy-duty

Hahahaha koditu aliratu anthuwa. Those crowd are completely deceitful, kodi a Tembo ndi a Muluzi sanapange msokhano osowa poponda pa Masitha mu 2014? Did they not lose miserably against Bingu? Did they not? They did. Adzayimbanso nyimbo yozolowereka ija yoti “atibera” Actually by now they just have to start composing rehearsing or practicing nyimbo yake. Inetu ku Masitha kuja ndidaliko koma I went there only to see and I know also a few more people who went there to see also.

Sure
Guest
Sure

Wabera ma vote … kumalawI we know kuti DPP sidzawina nde adzawine kubera

#DzukaniAmalawi
Guest
#DzukaniAmalawi

As some wise politician once said……do not be fooled that those who vote have all the power in a democratic dispensation, its those that count the votes who matter. The biggest lesson perhaps for our political parties is that the poor, uneducated and disfranchised have the same rights to those who are rich, educated and fully empowered. unfortunately for Malawi we have 80% of our population in the poor rural areas whose inhabitants are uneducated, unsophisticated and disfranchised. The support you see and read on social media, print media and radio/TV is all talking to the 20% of the population.… Read more »

Nalingula
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Nalingula

DPP’S team A and B strategy is to devide Votes, confuse voters.If Either team Wins you will see them merging.As for me I won’t be fooled nditoziwa omuvotera yanga yokha mwayirira.Simungandipusise.

Yahya Yahya Jammeh
Guest

The main stakeholder of elections is the electoral body. Have you asked MEC what lessons it has learnt from the mistake of its counterpart, ZEC when it delayed announcing results? Tensions rise and people begin to speculate when the referee is not decisive. This is exactly what happen sin Zimbabwe. Simply getting the opinions of political parties was not enough. In fact there is nothing new Malawians have learnt from the election in question because that’s how elections are conducted in Zimbabwe. Wasn’t it not similar to Kenya elections last year? Probably if the opposite had happened that could have… Read more »

Hlabezulu Ngonoonda
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Hlabezulu Ngonoonda

Your Excellency Yahya Yahya Jammeh, first, the political environment in Zimbabwe was not improved in order to convince voters that they could oppose ZANU PF without fear of violence or retribution. Second, ZEC showed little transparency that it had sufficient criteria to verify votes in a credible manner. Third, computer system used by ZEC were prone to manipulation. Fourth, the longer Priscilla Chigumba took to release the election results the longer it increased the prospects that the results are being doctored. However, there was doubt that ZANU PF was bound to lose the elections judging by Zimbabwe’s past history in… Read more »

Ecclesia
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Ecclesia

MCP has not been pushed to the sidelines. It is just enjoying peace. You will see what will happen on the polling day. DPP and UTM will suffer serious loses. Making noise does not mean votes, ask Nelson Chamisa of MDC.

Mangochi Kabwafu
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Mangochi Kabwafu

Anything to learn from these African shambles? Almost a week waiting, really? With larger population in the UK for instance, you get results within hours. Likewise in the US, you get results much quicker. Zopusa basi. Chilima, make sure you watch out these dirty tricks next year.

QueenB
Guest
QueenB

Under 5 million people voted? What’s the population of Zimbabwe? No wonder another nkhalamba has won (probably rigged). By the way, his nickname is ‘Crocodile’. Go figure!

Jacob Chitseko
Guest
Jacob Chitseko

zitelenso kuno next year kkkkkkk ana achepa DPP Boma

oMachemba
Guest
oMachemba

Kikiki So, it is finally stated here, in the last paragraph, that MCP, UDF and PP are only on the sidelines! And that the real fight will be between DPP and its offshoot UTM! As outlandish as this sounds, there may be a grain of truth here: But how does this make the rabid cheerleaders of MCP, and its leaders – oChakwera and Mia – now feel? Miserable, and really disrespected, I dare guess. But, back to one main lesson from Zimbabwe: The size of crowds at rallies, especially in the urban areas, may be misleading and meaningless. Chilima and… Read more »

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